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4 April, 2006 - 17:07 By Staff Reporter

Misidentification of patients targeted by Watford company

A Herts company has developed an innovative system to combat the threat of patient misidentification in hospitals.

Now Paxar UK Ltd, whose European headquarters is in Watford, has recruited Peterborough-based public relations consultancy Smye Holland Associates to help promote an innovative new product to combat the problem.

SHA is helping Paxar to launch its newly developed healthcare software solution.

The system improves patient safety by automatically identifying patients and then matching them with care products such as drugs or blood.

It overcomes traditional, manual methods of patient identification which are prone to error.

SHA is raising awareness and understanding of the benefits of using Paxar’s healthcare software solution in healthcare organisations through a variety of communications methods. This includes producing press releases, feature articles, leaflets and website copy to support the product launch.

Initially research was undertaken with hospital staff to understand their view of how such a system would be of benefit to them.

Paxar UK Ltd is part of Paxar Corporation, the world’s leading provider of labelling, merchandising and identification solutions for apparel manufacturers and retailers.

Its healthcare software solution was developed in response to a report by the National Patient Safety Agency that identified patient misidentification as a problem within the NHS.

Manual systems of identification used by most hospitals can result in patients being given incorrect blood or medication.

Paxar’s healthcare software solution uses wristbands that are issued to patients at the point of entry to the hospital. These contain a barcode which holds information such as the patient’s name, hospital number, date of birth and gender.

The wristbands can then be read automatically by handheld scanning devices at any location or ward around the hospital that uses the system.

Bedside ‘identity’ checks can be carried out in real time and verified against patient records on the main hospital computer system to ensure that the right patient is getting the treatment.

 

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