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2 May, 2019 - 13:43 By Kate Sweeney

CellCentric backed in blood cancers trials

Chesterford Research Park

CellCentric in Cambridge has received approval from the UK regulatory authority, the MHRA, to start clinical trials of its CCS1477 technology to treat certain blood cancers. 

The first-in-class p300/CBP inhibitor is already being tested in patients with late stage prostate cancer. In this new study, CCS1477 will be tested initially as a monotherapy in late stage cancer patients; acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients will be in one group and patients with multiple myeloma orlymphoma in another.

Chief investigator for the trial is Professor Andy Davies, University Hospital, Southampton, with additional sites to include Manchester and Leicester. The twin histone acetyl transferase proteins, p300 and CBP are critical cancer regulatory proteins. Inhibition of p300/CBP inhibits c-Myc as well as IRF4, which are important in multiple blood cancers. 

The twin histone acetyl transferase proteins, p300 and CBP are critical cancer regulatory proteins. Inhibition of p300/CBP inhibits c-Myc as well as IRF4, which are important in multiple blood cancers. 

Pre-clinical data supporting CCS1477’s application for haematological malignancies was recently presented at the annual American Association of Cancer Research (AACR) meeting, held in Atlanta. 

These studies show that once daily oral administration of CCS1477 leads to tumour regression in xenograft models of multiple myeloma and AML.

Karen Clegg, CellCentric’s director of clinical operations, said: “We are delighted to expand the breadth of clinical testing of CCS1477. Our first-in-class p300/CBP inhibitor has the potential to make a real difference in multiple, specific cancer types with large patient populations.”

Phase I clinical testing of CCS1477 began last year in patients with late stage, castrateresistant prostate cancer. 

CellCentric is a privately held business anchored at Chesterford Research Park, with Morningside Venture Investments as its lead investor. 

CCS1477’s progress has also benefited from awards from Innovate UK (BioMedical Catalyst) and the Prostate Cancer Foundation. The company maintains active collaborations with multiple research centres in Europe and the US.

CellCentric was co-founded with one of the pioneers of epigenetic research, Professor Azim Surani FRS CBE of the Gurdon Institute, University of Cambridge. Prof Surani discovered and described an epigenetic code, beyond DNA, that could be inherited and instruct cell fate.

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