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7 March, 2006 - 17:19 By Staff Reporter

CMR fuel cells aiming high in 2006

CMR Fuel Cells in Harston saw its share price rise 7p (3.16 per cent) as CEO John Halfpenny said he anticipated achieving “significant milestones that would position the company to become one of the world’s leading commercial fuel cell organisations.”

CMR Fuel Cells in Harston saw its share price rise 7p (3.16 per cent) as CEO John Halfpenny said he anticipated achieving “significant milestones that would position the company to become one of the world’s leading commercial fuel cell organisations.”

Last year, CMR demonstrated the world’s first ‘compact mixed-reactant’ direct methanol fuel cell stack with power density of 200W/l and had key patents cleared for grant in China and granted in Australia.

Halfpenny said: “Since being introduced to the company and its unique technology last year, it has become clear that the substantial reductions in size and cost implied by CMR’s approach to fuel cell architecture have the potential to play key roles in the mass commercialisation of fuel cells.

“Market interest for commercially viable fuel cells has increased significantly in the portable electronics industry for a wide range of uses – from laptop computers, games consoles and mobile phones to power tools and electric scooters.”

Although there are several drivers behind this demand there remain generic obstacles to successful commercialisation:-

• They must deliver volumetric power densities high enough to compete with current power supply systems

• They will have to be cheap enough to win consumer acceptance

• Fuel cell design will have to be compatible with established high-yield mass production techniques

Halfpenny said CMR’s technology could deliver these benefits by eliminating bulky components found in conventional fuel cells as well as enabling the replacement of traditionally expensive components with considerably cheaper and more reliable ones.

 

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