Advertisement: Mogrify
ARM Innovation Hub
Advertisement: RSM
RealVNC mid-banner general
Barr Ellison Solicitors – commercial property
Advertisement: Bradfield Centre mid
Mid banner advertisement: BDO
Advertisement: Cambridge Network
Advertisement EY mid banner
Advertisement: TTP
RealVNC mid banner careers
Advertisement: Wild Knight Vodka
20 March, 2015 - 12:37 By Kate Sweeney

Enval recycling trial with Coca-Cola and Nestlé funded by Defra

Dr Carlos Ludlow-Palafox, Enval managing director

Enval, the Cambridgeshire CleanTech company, is demonstrating aluminium recovery technology in high profile recycling trials with Coca-Cola, Nestlé and other major players.

The nine-month trial, already underway, is being funded by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) Action Based Research programme.

Enval’s pioneering technology is providing the recycling solution for the project which is designed to assess the feasibility of including flexible laminate packaging – such as food and drink pouches, pet food pouches and toothpaste tubes – in existing household recycling schemes. 

The trials are being conducted in partnership with Anthesis LRS, SUEZ environnement, Nestlé UK & Ireland and Coca-Cola Enterprises, targeting locations across the country. 

Collections and initial sorting are being managed by SUEZ environnement. Enval is recycling the material at its commercial demonstration facility at the Alconbury Enterprise Zone, near Huntingdon.

The trial covers 260 households, in local authority areas of Bracknell Forest Council, London Borough of Hounslow and Calderdale Council. Different methods of engaging with residents and collecting the material at the kerbside are being tested and the results of the trials will help determine best practice to increase the amount of flexible laminate packaging collected and recycled in England. 

They will also provide insight into how different communications approaches, consumer behaviour and brands influence collection models across different demographics.

Dr Carlos Ludlow-Palafox (pictured above), Enval’s managing director, said: “These trials are providing an important opportunity to prove that we can successfully capture and recycle the valuable aluminium, as well as recover the plastics as a fuel oil product. 

“This will present a solid business case for Enval’s microwave induced pyrolysis technology to be bolted on to existing materials facilities and help increase levels of recycling across the UK.”

Flexible laminate packaging has been widely adopted by fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) companies to improve product to pack weight ratio, reduce the transport costs and environmental impact attributable to packaging. Its popularity is also driven by the functionality that aluminium provides as a barrier, protecting products from oxygen, moisture and light.

The UK uses more than 160,000 tonnes of flexible laminate packaging each year, containing more than 17,000 tonnes of aluminium. When unrecyclable, this is a massive problem.

With a recycling solution, rigorous life cycle analysis indicates it to be a highly sustainable packaging solution as well as a substantial commercial opportunity, with a potential revenue stream of approximately £200 million a year in Europe from the sale of aluminium alone.

Enval has created the first solution to recycle laminate packaging and retrieve the valuable resources contained within it. The patented process is based on a technology known as microwave induced pyrolysis, a pyrolytic process in which microwave energy is used to heat and degrade plastics into useful pyrolysis oils. 

The fragile aluminium foil remains undamaged and can be extracted clean and ready to be reintroduced into the aluminium supply chain. Life cycle analysis shows that the aluminium obtained via this process has a carbon footprint 72 per cent lower than that of primary aluminium. 

The Government’s resource management Minister Dan Rogerson said: “Defra is pleased to support this project, which is part of the Government’s wider approach to enabling businesses to be more sustainable. I look forward to seeing the results of these innovative studies which could lead to us extracting more value from our resources.”

Newsletter Subscription

Stay informed of the latest news and features